It is difficult to know whether to laugh or to cry.

So, white refugees are streaming out of the burbs with their loot in big sacks on their aching backs, heading for Canada? The Great Trek II has begun and Brandon Huntley has gone to prepare a place for us in Saskatchewan or Churchill Manitoba? Hmm, can’t wait.

You have to ask: what has Canada done to deserve Brandon Huntley?

Brandon Huntley ... a picture tells a thousand words

Brandon Huntley ... stands out like a sore thumb ... hmm, yes he does rather

But then you remember. Oh, yes! His application for refugee status was successful. The panel that interviewed him accepted that he had been attacked 7  times (including 3 stabbings) by black people. Because he was white. Because he “stands out like a sore thumb”. They accepted that Brandon’s attackers called him a “white dog” and a “settler”. Ag shame, man!

So Canada opened the door. So Canada deserves what it gets. And watch out! Here we come, with our braais and boerewors and quaint views about the world. Canada you’re gonna love us!

Part of me is delighted by Brandon and the silly Canadian immigration board panel that accepted him in.  He might well be exaggerating to bolster his immigration case, but it is certainly within the realms of possibility that his story is true.

The country’s crime levels are out of control. There is racial anger swirling around the body politic.  The  “race card” gets played at every turn by cheating and failed politicians, bureaucrats and businessmen. It’s enough already.

But while we rub our hands in glee when the weak puncture the pretensions of the powerful, it is important to remember that the real and most numerous victims of  most sorts of crime in this country, especially violent crime, are poor and black. And what has consigned these victims to the bottom of the pile is Apartheid and its ongoing consequences. It’s difficult to think that someone called “Brandon” in the grip of trying to convert his tourist visa in Canada is justifiably placed at the centre-stage of South African history.

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